Travel Nasal Cleaning Pot. Plastic.

Ingredients: HEAVY-DUTY LEAD-FREE FOOD-GRADE HDPE

Neti Pot

$13.95Price
  • The use of the Neti pot is a very effective method to clear away crusting in the nasal passages and for relieving symptoms from allergies and environmental irritants that cause congestion and facial pain and pressure. A Neti pot works by thinning the mucus and flushing it out of the nasal passages. Use of a saline solution helps the cilia (the tiny hair like structures that line the nasal cavities) draw out the excess mucus and irritants. To use the Neti pot mix 16 ounces of warm distilled water with 1 teaspoon of the finest grind natural salt (sea salt, Himalayan, real salt, etc). Some people like to add ½ teaspoon of baking soda to buffer the solution and make it gentler on the nose. If you don't want to use baking soda, add a drop or two of clove or eucalyptus oil to your solution as well as about ¼ teaspoon of either sesame or olive oil. This can be stored up to 5 days in a covered container. The solution should be close to body temperature when you are using it. Once the the Neti pot is filled, tilt your head over the sink at about a 45-degree angle. Place the spout into your top nostril and gently pour the saline solution into that nostril. The fluid will flow through your nasal cavity and out the other nostril. Blow your nose to get rid of any remaining liquid, then refill the Neti pot and repeat the process on the other side. Use about 2 to 4 ounces in each nostril. You shouldn't have any of the solution run down your throat. However, if you do just spit it out. You can use the Neti pot daily, 3-4 times a day if needed in chronic conditions and after that three times a week is enough to keep your nasal passages clear and cleaned out. Under normal circumstances, you should not feel any burning or stinging. If there is any discomfort you can use less salt in your solution or change the temperature of your water. Keep the Neti pot clean by rinsing with warm water and air drying between uses, or wash in the dishwasher. Information from Michelle Knuteson